How to use LinkedIn API in Python

LinkedIn API in Python

LinkedIn is a powerful professional networking platform that offers an Application Programming Interface (API) to developers. The LinkedIn API allows developers to access various features and data from LinkedIn, such as user profiles, connections, job postings, and more. We will explore how to use the LinkedIn API in Python to integrate LinkedIn functionalities into your applications.

Prerequisites: To follow along with the examples in this article, you’ll need the following:

  • Python installed on your machine (version 3.6 or above)
  • An active LinkedIn account
  • A LinkedIn Developer account to create and manage API credentials

Set up a LinkedIn Developer Account

To access the LinkedIn API, you need to create a LinkedIn Developer account and register your application. Follow these steps:

  1. Go to the LinkedIn Developer Portal (https://www.linkedin.com/developers/) and sign in with your LinkedIn account.
  2. Create a new application by clicking on the “Create App” button.
  3. Provide the necessary details such as the application name, description, and website URL.
  4. Agree to the terms of use and click on the “Create App” button.
  5. Once the application is created, you will be redirected to the app’s dashboard. Note down the “Client ID” and “Client Secret” values, as you’ll need them later.

Install the Required Libraries

To interact with the LinkedIn API in Python, we’ll be using the python-linkedin library. Install it using the following command:

pip install python-linkedin

Authenticate Your Application

To make LinkedIn API in Python requests on behalf of a LinkedIn user, your application needs to obtain an access token. Follow these steps to authenticate your application:

Import the necessary modules in your Python script

python
import linkedin
from linkedin.linkedin import (LinkedInAuthentication, LinkedInApplication)

Set up the authentication

python
API_KEY = 'Your_Client_ID'
API_SECRET = 'Your_Client_Secret'
RETURN_URL = 'http://localhost:8000'
authentication = LinkedInAuthentication(API_KEY, API_SECRET, RETURN_URL, linkedin.PERMISSIONS.enums.values())

Generate the authorization URL and redirect the user to it

python
authorization_url = authentication.authorization_url
print('Please go here and authorize,', authorization_url)
  • Once the user authorizes your application, they will be redirected to the specified RETURN_URL. Capture the code parameter from the redirected URL.
  • Exchange the authorization code for an access token:
python
authentication.authorization_code = 'Authorization_Code_From_Redirect_URL'
access_token = authentication.get_access_token()

Initialize the LinkedIn application

python
application = LinkedInApplication(authentication)

Step 4: Make API Requests: With the authentication and access token in place, you can now make API requests to retrieve data from LinkedIn. Here are a few examples:

Retrieve user profile information

python
profile = application.get_profile()
print(profile)

Search for people

python
people = application.search_profile(selectors=[{'people': ['first-name', 'last-name']}], params={'keywords': 'Python'})
print(people)

Get user connections

python
connections = application.get_connections()
print(connections)

These examples only scratch the surface of what you can do with the LinkedIn API. Refer to the official LinkedIn API documentation for more details on available endpoints and parameters.

How do you call a URL in Python?

In Python, you can call a URL or make HTTP requests using the requests library, which provides a simple and intuitive way to interact with URLs. Here’s an example of how to call a URL in Python using the requests library:

  • Install the requests library if you haven’t already by running the following command:
pip install requests
  • Import the requests module in your Python script:
python
import requests
  • Use the requests.get() function to make a GET request to the desired URL:
python
response = requests.get('https://www.example.com')
  • You can then access the response status code, content, headers, and other information:
python
print('Status Code:', response.status_code)
print('Response Content:', response.text)
print('Headers:', response.headers)
  • If you need to pass parameters or headers with your request, you can provide them as arguments to the get() function:
python
response = requests.get('https://www.example.com', params={'key1': 'value1', 'key2': 'value2'}, headers={'User-Agent': 'Mozilla/5.0'})
  • Similarly, you can make other types of requests like POST, PUT, DELETE, etc. using the respective functions (requests.post(), requests.put(), requests.delete()) and provide the necessary parameters.

By using the requests library, you can easily call URLs and interact with the content and responses received from those URLs.

How to get JSON data from URL in Python?

To get JSON data from a URL in Python, you can use the requests library along with the json module. Here’s an example of how to do it:

  • Install the requests library if you haven’t already by running the following command:
pip install requests
  • Import the necessary modules in your Python script:
python
import requests
import json
  • Use the requests.get() function to make a GET request to the URL that returns JSON data:
python
response = requests.get('https://api.example.com/data.json')
  • Check if the request was successful (status code 200):
python
if response.status_code == 200:
# Parse the JSON data
json_data = json.loads(response.text)
# Now you can work with the JSON data as a Python object
print(json_data)
else:
print('Error:', response.status_code)
  • If the JSON data returned from the URL is in a different encoding (e.g., UTF-8), you can specify it while parsing:
python
json_data = json.loads(response.text, encoding='utf-8')
  • Once you have parsed the JSON data, you can access its elements just like any other Python object. For example, if the JSON contains a dictionary with key-value pairs:
python
value = json_data['key']

By combining the requests library and the json module, you can easily retrieve JSON data from a URL in Python and work with it in your application.

How to send HTTP request in Python?

In Python, you can send HTTP requests using the requests library, which provides a convenient and intuitive way to interact with URLs and make various types of requests. Here’s an example of how to send an HTTP request in Python:

  • Install the requests library if you haven’t already by running the following command:
pip install requests
  • Import the requests module in your Python script:
python
import requests
  • Use the appropriate function (requests.get(), requests.post(), requests.put(), requests.delete(), etc.) to send the desired HTTP request to the specified URL. For example, let’s send a GET request:
python
response = requests.get('https://www.example.com')
  • You can access the response status code, content, headers, and other information:
python
print('Status Code:', response.status_code)
print('Response Content:', response.text)
print('Headers:', response.headers)
  • If you need to send additional parameters or headers with your request, you can provide them as arguments to the corresponding request function. For example, sending a POST request with data:
python

response = requests.post('https://www.example.com/post', data=data)
  • Similarly, you can send requests with different HTTP methods by using the appropriate function and providing the necessary arguments.

By using the requests library, you can easily send HTTP requests in Python and retrieve the responses from the server, allowing you to interact with web APIs and retrieve data from URLs.

How to connect HTTP in Python?

To connect to an HTTP server in Python, you can use the http.client module from the Python standard library. It provides a low-level interface for making HTTP requests and handling responses. Here’s an example of how to connect to an HTTP server in Python:

  • Import the http.client module:
python
import http.client
  • Create an instance of the HTTPConnection class, providing the server’s hostname and port number:
python
conn = http.client.HTTPConnection('www.example.com', 80)
  • Send an HTTP request using the request() method of the connection object. For example, let’s send a GET request:
python
conn.request('GET', '/')
  • Retrieve the response from the server using the getresponse() method:
python
response = conn.getresponse()
  • You can access various properties of the response, such as the status code, headers, and the response content:
python
print('Status Code:', response.status)
print('Response Headers:', response.getheaders())
print('Response Content:', response.read().decode())
  • After you have finished working with the response, close the connection to the server:
python
conn.close()

Note: The above example assumes an HTTP connection on port 80. If you want to establish an HTTPS connection, you can use the http.client.HTTPSConnection class instead and specify the appropriate port (e.g., 443).

The http.client module provides a basic way to connect to HTTP servers in Python. However, for most use cases, it is recommended to use higher-level libraries such as requests, which provide a more convenient and feature-rich interface for working with HTTP requests and responses.

Can Python directly run on HTTP?

Python itself is a programming language and does not directly run on HTTP. Python is typically executed by an interpreter, such as CPython, which reads and executes Python code.

However, Python can be used to develop web applications and server-side scripts that run on an HTTP server. Python web frameworks like Flask, Django, and Pyramid allow you to build web applications that respond to HTTP requests. These frameworks handle the HTTP communication, routing, and request handling for you, making it easier to develop web applications.

When you run a Python web application, you typically deploy it on an HTTP server that supports running Python code, such as Apache with mod_wsgi, Nginx with uWSGI, or Gunicorn. These servers act as intermediaries between the HTTP clients (browsers, API clients, etc.) and your Python web application. They receive incoming HTTP requests and pass them to your Python code for processing. The Python code then generates an HTTP response that is sent back to the clients via the HTTP server.

So, while Python itself doesn’t run directly on HTTP, you can use Python to build web applications and server-side scripts that can be executed by an HTTP server to handle HTTP requests and responses.

Conclusion

In this article, we explored how to use the LinkedIn API in Python to integrate LinkedIn functionalities into your applications. We covered the steps required to set up a LinkedIn Developer account, authenticate your application, and make LinkedIn API in Python requests to retrieve data from LinkedIn. With the LinkedIn API in Python, you can unlock the power of LinkedIn’s professional network and enhance your applications with valuable professional data.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You May Also Like